Home » Philosophy, Its Scope and Relations: An Introductory Course of Lectures (1902) by Henry Sidgwick
Philosophy, Its Scope and Relations: An Introductory Course of Lectures (1902) Henry Sidgwick

Philosophy, Its Scope and Relations: An Introductory Course of Lectures (1902)

Henry Sidgwick

Published April 1st 2009
ISBN : 9781104438142
Hardcover
272 pages
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 About the Book 

EDITORIAL NOTESOME three months before his death, when he knew that his illness was likely to be fatal, Professor Sidgwick asked the editor to take charge of certain of his uncompleted works which he thought might be found suitable for publication.MoreEDITORIAL NOTESOME three months before his death, when he knew that his illness was likely to be fatal, Professor Sidgwick asked the editor to take charge of certain of his uncompleted works which he thought might be found suitable for publication. About the same time he dictated an account of them and made various suggestions in writing concerning their treatment, substantially repeating what he had before said in person. The present book he described as a course of eleven lectures, together with three printed lectures, in which I attempt to define the scope of Philosophy and its relation to other studies, especially Psychology, Logic, History, etc. This, he adds, I judge might with advantage be published. It wants revision. In the earlier part there would be some difficulty in fitting in the printed lectures with the oral comments on them, and in the later part there are some repetitions which would have to be cut out.Professor Sidgwick had long ago planned such an introduc tion to the study of philosophy. In 1892 he delivered a short course of lectures bearing the title of the present work. These, considerably expanded, were repeated as Elements of Philosophy (Theoretical and Practical) in the two following years. In 1897 he began working up this material, and three lectures, dealing severally with the Scope of Philosophy, its Eelation to Psychology, and the Scope of Metaphysics, were privately printed. But his further progress was temporarily—and, as it has proved, was permanently—interrupted in consequence of his undertaking to deliver in 1898 and onwards the complete course of lectures on Metaphysics, as specified in the syllabus of the Moral Sciences Tripos. Though called Metaphysics, the subject asoutlined there is really in the main Epistemology- and there is little doubt that the more detailed treatment of the Theory of Knowledge, which this change of work involved, would have been turned to account, had Professor Sidgwick been able to resume the preparation of his Philosophy.To the students attending this l Metaphysics course copies of the lectures already printed were distributed, and the first five lectures of the course were occupied in supplementing and elucidating these—the whole by way of introduction before entering upon the study of the special questions and text-books prescribed. Out of this material, that is to say the three printed lectures and five manuscript lectures referred to in Professor Sidgwicks statement as the earlier part, Lectures I.-V. of this book as it stands have been made up. Only a few of the printed sentences have been omitted: these have been replaced by fuller expositions in manuscript that seemed obviously meant to supersede them. But from the written lectures the omissions have been more extensive, oral com ments being here frequent that were plainly intended only to serve a temporary purpose. Lecture V. is unfortunately very incomplete: the special topic of which it treats—the Kelation of Metaphysics to Epistemology—was reached only at the very end of the last printed lecture, and even in the corresponding manuscript lecture it is but cursorily handled. In fact this topic was one appropriate to a later stage in the course of lectures on Metaphysics, to which the earlier part of this book served as an introduction: the fuller treatment was therefore naturally deferred. Professor Sidgwick was himself well aware of this defect and suggested that perhaps some assistance might be derived from using certain portions of the Meta physics course which he goes on to mention. But this course assumes the constant use of particular text-books—Kants Critique, his Prolegomena, Sigwarts Logic, and several others— and detailed references to these are frequent: without re-casting and in p